18 mar. 2004

I didn't quote the last six lines of that awful poem about the police psychic, it is true, as pointed out by someone with a nearly illegible grape colored blog. (You can't read black print on a dark, grape-colored background; and please, do something about those apostrophes.) The reason is that I simply got carried away. I was simply quoting a fragment to give some idea of what I meant by treating the reader without respect--and then I went on longer than I should have about why this writing was so bad. I didn't want to quote any more of it than I needed to.

Is the second part of the poem any better? The conclusion is too cute for words: "Guilt is too quick for me." The reach for the "profound" conclusion is a common flaw in this type of light verse. What's the point? It only makes sense if you don't think about it too hard! Don't make me read any more of this crap than I have to!