16 abr. 2009

Here are some more principles of academic pragmatics:

(1) Maxim of significance. Maximize expression of importance or significance of the subject you are addressing.

(2) Maxim of authoritativeness. Maximize expression of your own authority to speak about this subject, your own acquaintance with the subject matter.

(3) Maxim of complexity / originality. All other things being equal, maximize claims to originality and / or complexity. Never advocate for a less nuanced approach to something. A simpler solution to a critical problem might be acceptable, however, if it is strikingly original.

(4) Maxim of coherence. Present information and arguments in a maximally organized way.

(5) Maxim of scholarly solidarity. Maximize expressions of solidarity with the scholarly community generally, even when taking issue with the scholarly findings of particular members of the community.

(6) Maxim of rectitude. Emphasize solidarity with "politically correct" principles where ever appropriate.

(7) Meta-maxim of conventionality. When following other pragmatic maxims, aim to sound utterly conventional. Minimize breaks with scholarly decorum.

I am not advocating these principle but describing them. I'm not saying that I don't follow them either.