6 jul. 2006

I noticed recently i am a mild synesthesiac. I see colors. Federico García Lorca, for example, is a bright, orangish red. (I don't mean the person himself, but his entire poetic work.) The number 4 is also red, I noticed when doing a sukoku puzzle recently. Even though the actual ink used was blue, the number 4 was still red.

I only recently thought about what color Lorca was. But I have the strong conviction of always having known it.

I say "mild" because most things have no color for me, and my impressions are often rather faint. People with stronger cases than I have might see more colors and with much stronger conviction. I'm not entirely sure.

8 comentarios:

Henry Gould dijo...

A huge thing with Nabokov, who had this bent to an almost pathological degree (92).

Henry Gould dijo...

in the shade, too.

C. Dale dijo...

My brother is this way. But he convinced the number 7 is red.

Cliff dijo...

I've always thought Lorca as sepia. Neruda is a vivid turquoise, Rilke as deep purple, or gold.

shanna dijo...

rimbaud too, no? (i mean, he was a synethesiac.)

lc1936 dijo...

I'm not sure: Romance sonambulo has to be green. But... if Lorca was dyslexic (as Andrew A. Anderson suggests), maybe he was a daltonic too.

Jonathan dijo...

Saying Lorca is green because of "verde que te quiero verde" misses the point entirely. A poem about the color green could be completely orange in its own color. Just like a 4 printed in green ink is still red.

lc1936 dijo...

Yeah I do miss the point. Not that I despise (despise? I mean 'despreciar') that point of view. In fact, I'm really curious about the example of number four as red. I'm not even close to that 'synesthesiac' experience, but I kind of relate emotions and colours, but I cannot relate numbers to neither of them (except in Trilce, maybe).