28 may. 2006

"En l'air un cerf-volant marche à souhait; il plane en ocsillant, instable, inquiet et campé vers le silence, assez haut; il est découpé en forme de ballon sans passagers, et flotte soutenu par le vent rapide qui le frotte; il présente l'aspect d'un mince aérostat en détresse, penché, monstrueusement plat..."

That's seven lines (for those without French, it's about a kite[ 'cerf-volant' ] buffeted by winds, looking like a hot-air balloon without passengers, etc...) .

You might imagine it divided up into syntactical units like this, but then look where the rhyme words fall in bold:

"En l'air un cerf-volant marche à souhait;

il plane en ocsillant, instable, inquiet et campé vers le silence, assez haut;

il est découpé en forme de ballon sans passagers,

et flotte soutenu par le vent rapide qui le frotte;

il présente l'aspect d'un mince aérostat en détresse,

penché, monstrueusement plat..."


Where is the caesura in all of this? I'm glad you asked. This time I've marked after the sixth syllable of each line.


"En l'air un cerf-volant / marche à souhait;

il plane en ocsillant, instable, / inquiet et campé vers le silence, assez / haut;

il est découpé en forme de ballon / sans passagers,

et flotte soutenu par le vent / rapide qui le frotte;

il présente l'aspect / d'un mince aérostat en détresse,

penché, / monstrueusement plat..."


It looks like the only rule Roussel follows is not to have the sixth and seventh syllable in the same word.